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I’m Nervous About Having a Root Canal

I’m Nervous About Having a Root Canal

Dentists perform root canals to save teeth. You may be shocked to learn that a root canal is no more uncomfortable than getting a filling! If you’ve heard that root canals are terribly painful, keep reading! 

Dr. Stephen Hiroshige and his staff have performed hundreds of root canals over the years, and are well aware that the procedure has something of a bad reputation. But, if you’ve ever had a filling, you already know what to expect. 

Why you need a root canal

When Dr. Hiroshige recommends a root canal, he has one goal: to save your tooth. When you have an infection in the pulp, or inner soft tissue, of your tooth, the best way to repair it is to have a root canal. If left untreated, the infection can lead to an abscess, it can affect your gum and bone health, and it can even cause problems in other parts of your body. 

What happens during a root canal

When you have a root canal, Dr. Hiroshige drills a small hole in your tooth so that he can get to the area where the infection is. He then removes the infected pulp and the nerve in your tooth, thoroughly cleans the area, fills it with a specialized rubber-like material, and seals it.

Later, you may come back in for a crown to protect your tooth.

How you remain comfortable

Thanks to modern dentistry techniques and anesthesia, you can expect the procedure to happen quickly and to be comfortable while the work is done. The area is completely numbed, so even though you may feel some pressure, it shouldn’t hurt.

After your procedure, as the anesthetic wears off, your mouth may feel sore, or you may have some mild swelling, but in nearly all cases, over-the-counter pain relievers are effective in easing any discomfort. Although you can return to your normal daily activities, we recommend waiting until the numbness has completely worn off before you eat.

Long-term outlook

Root canals are common and effective, and have a 95% satisfaction rate. In other words, most people are glad that they have the procedure done. 

The crown, placed after your root canal to protect your tooth, is cosmetically pleasing and with proper care should last a lifetime. You get to keep your natural tooth and all its functionality, and the infection is cleared up so that your health is no longer at risk because of it. 

Take care of your oral health

If you need a root canal, don’t be nervous! Schedule the procedure, and enjoy better oral health. It’s much riskier to avoid having the root canal, and you’ll likely need more involved and potentially painful care if you wait and the infection spreads. 

Schedule your appointment with Dr. Hiroshige today, and save your tooth. 

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